Having interns on the QA team

Internships are good for the interns, right? As an intern, you get a chance to learn, to be in a professional environment, sometimes- class credit and of course, some of your first professional references.  Interns get to be around the processes they are learning about first hand, they get to attend daily standups, read through requirements and work on project deadlines. It can be a great experience, but not just for the interns. The whole department can benefit from having some amazing interns around.

Having interns on the team has brought a different point of view. While they don’t have as much professional work experience they do know about the process and are used to learning new things quickly. I’ve been impressed with the quality of interns we have gotten. It is also great to have people with a little more programming knowledge who can help us make adjustments and revisions to tools.

Managing interns provides many of the same complications that managing a regular team of full time people does, but with some added quirks. The biggest quirk is that you have to realize that this job is not their focus. Sure, you spend 40 hours a week at it and it is your career. It is really important to you. But for them, at best this is part of their education, and at worst, it is an after school job. School comes first. Finals week, family vacations, homework- all of that is higher priority. Which is as it should be.

Also, they aren’t used to the office. It can be overwhelming. I personally think this is one of the best advantages an internships can provide, because they can become more comfortable with a professional setting early. Usually this isn’t a problem, but when assigning out projects or attending meetings, it is a good thing to remember.

Lets be honest, for some reason, not many people go to college to be a software QA. There aren’t really any programs and a lot of computer science programs don’t even include it as a required class. Want to get people excited about QA? Why not include it as part of the process while you are studying in college.

I like to think that I’m helping out future QAs by teaching future devs that the QA department does work hard. We experiment with new tools and new languages until we find the right mix for the project, we know how to get around the command line and can read and write some code, we pour over requirements documents and offer suggestions and ask questions. We act as user advocates, we clarify stories, keep long suites of tests debugged and running. We know there is limited time and so we test quickly, doing our best to squeeze out as much testing as we can in what little extra time there is in a project. I jokingly tell them (but not so jokingly) to remember all that when they are leading a Dev team some day.

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One response to this post.

  1. Very nice, Devon!

    It’s not always easy on the company or department to go through the extra effort involved in hiring, training, and managing interns.

    But as you point out, it can provide benefits to the company and the intern both. Sounds like your experience has been very positive.

    I’ve had good experiences with internships in the past. (http://strazzere.blogspot.com/2010/04/hiring-qa-interns.html) I wish my current shop was in a position to do this, too.

    Reply

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